What’s Up Wendesday: Why I Got Into Conservation. Fish and Wildlife Regional Directors Weigh in, Part II

Much is made of the growing disconnect between people and the outdoors. The Service, like many conservation organizations, is putting great emphasis on attracting the next generation of scientists, communicators, economists, technicians and anyone passionate about wild things and wild places. So we asked some of this current generation what got them into conservation.

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Invasive Species Eradication Effort Shows Promise for One of World’s Largest Albatross Colonies

For the first time in years, choking mats of an invasive plant pest are receding from Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, opening critically needed nesting space for rare seabirds like the albatross. As cornstalk-high stands of Verbesina encelioides, or golden crownbeard, yield to an assault by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, hope for the birds is rising.

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Photo: Verbesina on Midway Atoll (Dan Clark/Creative Commons)

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What’s Up Wednesday: Why I Got Into Conservation: FWS Regional Directors Weigh In

Much is made of the growing disconnect between people and the outdoors. The Service, like many conservation organizations, is putting great emphasis on attracting the next generation of scientists, communicators, economists, technicians and anyone passionate about wild things and wild places. So we asked some of this current generation what got them into conservation.

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Meet the Species: Marmoteering in Olympic National Park

By Zach Radmer, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, USFWS

 Blogger’s note: Zach Radmer coordinates Endangered Species Act issues with the U.S. Forest Service and the National Park Service. His recent collaborations with the National Park Service, a sister agency in the Department of the Interior, involved some important animals, namely the Pacific fisher, marbled murrelet and the bull trout. Today’s blog post looks at the Olympic marmot, an animal we don’t talk much about.

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